Onsite and Online
Thursday, Aug. 25 - 7 p.m.

Reverence and Resistance: The Black Church and the Fight for Full Citizenship

During and after Reconstruction, African American congregations grew their churches into central spaces of intellectual development, community organization and safety. Dr. Randal Jelks discusses the more than 200-year-old legacy of Black faith, church life and the struggle for freedom in America.
Lecture and Social Hour
Wednesday, Aug. 24 - 6 p.m.

Ukrainian Independence

Stand With Ukraine KC and the Ukrainian Club of Kansas City come together in discussion with Dr. Donald Jensen of the United States Institute of Peace to connect the dots between the conflicts of the past and the present. Ticketed social hour to follow with all proceeds benefiting aid efforts in Ukraine.
Lecture
Thursday, Aug. 11 - 7 p.m.

Reconstruction and the Origins of Jim Crow

Reconstruction is a critical and misunderstood period in American history. Dr. Kate Masur discusses the efforts – and the opposition – towards creating a multi-racial democracy.
Lecture
Saturday, Aug. 6 - 10:30 a.m.

Mrs. Wilson’s Knitting Circle: Russia’s Sisters of Mercy

Dr. Laurie Stoff joins this month’s Mrs. Wilson’s Knitting Circle to unwind how Russia’s ‘sisters of mercy’ experienced and impacted the Great War – breaking gender barriers and forging new paths for themselves.
At River Bluff Brewing
Thursday, Aug. 18 - 5:30 p.m.

Modernist Happy Hour

Join the Modernists for cocktails and make connections with other Museum supporters on the third Thursday of the month. Learn more about upcoming events, membership and ways to support our local national treasure. This month's Happy Hour is at River Bluff Brewing.
Free to the Public
Saturday, Aug. 20 - 5 p.m.

Kansas City's Great Balloon Glow

Spend a firelit summer evening with us at Kansas City’s second ever Great Balloon Glow! Rows of tethered hot air balloons will fire up their burners to create a magnificent, colorful display you have to see to believe.
Lecture
Tuesday, July 12 - 6:30 p.m.

The Armenian Genocide: Origins, Factors and Repercussions

The arrest of 250 Armenians in April of 1915 was the start of a massacre. That massacre helped inform the creation of a new word, genocide, in 1944. Join Dr. Bedross DerMatossian as he explores the historical background, differing interpretations, the magnitude and the repercussions of the Armenian Genocide.

Black Soldiers in WWI

Oral history provides rich support to the written records that fill the Museum and Memorial’s collection. In these interviews recorded in 1980, Columbus Morris, Robert Sweeney and Clay Ryan give voice
Onsite and Online
Thursday, July 28 - 6:30 p.m.

Women and Warfare

Throughout history, women have written military doctrine and developed thorough studies of warfare, yet their names and words fall to the wayside. Join Lieutenant Colonel Nikki Dean as she describes the story of women and their leadership in the development of the profession of arms.
Members Only
Wednesday, July 27 - 6 p.m.

Toast the Tower

Members, join us for a summer happy hour and raise a glass to one of the most recognizable landmarks of Kansas City! Enjoy the views from the top of the Tower after hours and a reception on the Memorial Courtyard.
Living History
Sunday, July 24 - 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Day in the Life: Medical

For July, the Living History Volunteer Corps are on site to share stories of medical practices during the war. Join us as we learn about how medicine was used and changed in response to new diseases and injuries.
At River Bluff Brewing
Thursday, July 21 - 5:30 p.m.

Modernist Happy Hour

Join the Modernists for cocktails and make connections with other Museum supporters on the third Thursday of the month. Learn more about upcoming events, membership and ways to support our local national treasure. This month's Happy Hour is at River Bluff Brewing.
Lecture
Tuesday, July 19 - 6:30 p.m.

WWI Changed Us: Health Threats and the World War

Dr. Yücel Yanıkdağ, professor at the University of Richmond, examines the spread of several diseases that further devastated the Ottoman Empire beyond the battlefield. While the “long war” ended in 1922, its demographic and disease-related consequences continued for decades.
Teacher Workshop
Thursday, July 14 - 12:30-1:45 p.m.

Teacher Workshop: Native American Service in WWI

Why did Native Americans serve in in such large numbers in WWI despite not being recognized as U.S. or sovereign citizens? How did they use their cultural and spiritual heritage to serve this country? Join us, in partnership with the American Battlefields Trust, to learn why and how.
At Johnson County Museum
Wednesday, July 13 - 6 p.m.

When Freedom Changed America

Join Dr. Edgar Tidwell in a discussion on what freedom meant to Americans who lived through the Emancipation Proclamation and Americans who participated in the March on Washington, 100 years apart. In partnership with Johnson County Museum’s special exhibit ‘REDLINED: Cities, Suburbs, and Segregation.’